The Garden

It’s the beginning of yet another week, I know

I know the dark calls to you sometimes

I know you walk down roads you know you shouldn’t

I know you observe your reflection through a jumble of shards

I know you’re worn out, tired of reliving patterns of painful choices

I sense you feel hollow at times

like life is teasing you, dancing in front of you,

but escaping you somehow

i know you live in the disconnect between where you are

and what’s happening outside of you

i know how much it hurts to live there, in the divide

between what you feel you are, and what you wish you could be

The sun has kissed your skin and you have inhaled it with complete trust

and you sometimes move without knowing what’s next

at times it feels paralysing to live with yourself.

I know you’ve worked so hard to control the outcome of your life

that you forget to meet yourself in the quiet and breath yourself full again

that you live in the shallow end and you forget to go deep,

breath deep ujjayi

you forget there is wealth of abundance and trust in you

i know there are places in yourself that you do not love

the parts you wrestle away

you visit them them from time to time, hoping they’re not there

i know you long to live in bliss

and when you arrive there you are so alive as if everything around you

is telling you yes, you’re home.

but i know shadows come while you’re asleep

and drag you down the familiar landscape of fear

I know you wonder if the light will ever return

because you’re tired of this upbeat dance between the two worlds.

you’re learning to taste heaven, grown wings

you’re accepting the difference

between sun soaked mornings and dark forests

you are human my dear and are allowed to be in both places

you are not damaged

you are not failing

you are allowed to be lost in dark rivers

be gentle when doubt comes, when fear chokes

when darkness debilitates you

spend special care to cultivate the garden of love when you come across these dark corridors.

know that you are offered the chance to tend your garden

the dark offers you a chance to love all the places you’d never dare

all the places you curse

where we deprive ourselves of love is where we need it most

when the dark comes , tell it what it what it wants so badly to hear,

You are loved.

WORLD’S GORGEOUS WATERFALLS

Hey Friends. These lovely pictures were so enchanting that I had to share them. Enjoy!

 

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SKOGAFOSS, ICELAND
A horseback rider overlooks a broad cascade in Iceland. PHOTOGRAPH BY SURANGA WEERATUNGA

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SKOGAFOSS, ICELAND
A visitor is dwarfed by the cascading water and mist of one of Iceland’s famous waterfalls.PHOTOGRAPH BY WITOLD ZIOMEK

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EL CHALTÉN, ARGENTINA
Moody weather shadows a cataract in Patagonia. PHOTOGRAPH BY LIANA MANUKYAN

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ELK FALLS, CANADA
This falls of the Campbell River blankets the surrounding rock with an icy spray. PHOTOGRAPH BY EIKO JONES

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MULTNOMAH FALLS, OREGON
After driving 11 hours straight, photographer Casey Horner

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STIRLING FALLS, NEW ZEALAND
Stirling Falls plummets from a height of nearly 500 feet in Fjorland National Park. PHOTOGRAPH BY LEONA CHORAZYOVA

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YOSEMITE FALLS, CALIFORNIA
In late April, snowmelt increases the flow of the iconic, 2,425-foot waterfall.PHOTOGRAPH BY JEB BUCHMAN

nat geo 7UPPER YELLOWSTONE FALLS, WYOMING
“One of my favorite parks,” says photographer Gosha L

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NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA
The famous falls has the highest flow rate in North America and attracts about 30 million tourists a year.PHOTOGRAPH BY ISABELLE D

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DEVILS PUNCHBOWL, NEW ZEALAND
“This small southern beech tree caught my eye just as we were about to head back down the track to the township,” says photographer Wynston Cooper

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LOWER YELLOWSTONE FALLS, WYOMING
Colorful clouds roll over the falls, seen from the popular South Rim overlook known as Artist Point.PHOTOGRAPH BY RAYMOND CHOO

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RISTAFALLET, SWEDEN
Nearly 200 feet wide, this popular waterfall is one of Sweden’s largest.PHOTOGRAPH BY CALLE HÖGLUND

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SALTO CORUMBÁ, BRAZIL
Faced with tourists swimming at the base of the 230-foot-tall falls, photographer Victor Lima

 

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MULAFOSSUR WATERFALL, FAROE ISLANDS
A tall waterfall cascades off a promontory of Vagar, one of the North Atlantic’s autonomous Faroe Islands. PHOTOGRAPH BY HAITONG YU

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VERZASCA RIVER, SWITZERLAND

After a two-hour-trek, photographer Marc Henauer found one of the Swiss river’s many cataracts

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GULLFOSS, ICELAND
A visitor gazes into the gorge formed by this powerful waterfall in southern Iceland. PHOTOGRAPH BY RUSSELL PEARSON

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NELSON FALLS, AUSTRALIA
Trees diffuse the light of the setting sun across this tiered waterfall on Tasmania’s west coast.PHOTOGRAPH BY JIEFEI WANG

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TINAGO FALLS, PHILIPPINES
Taking its name from a Tagalog word meaning “hidden,” this remote but popular cascade can only be reached by descending 500 winding steps.PHOTOGRAPH BY KATHLEEN TUGANO

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BANFF, CANADA
Water still runs beneath the icy shell of this waterfall in Banff National Park.PHOTOGRAPH BY KATHLEEN CROFT

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PACIFIC NORTHWEST, UNITED STATES
PHOTOGRAPH BY BENITO MARTINEZ

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PALAIOKARYA, GREECE
These two waterfalls were artificially created beneath a stone bridge.PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS VASILIADIS

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KIRKJUFELLSFOSS, ICELAND
“The night left a thin layer of snow over the highest mountains [in] fresh air that is difficult to have in our cities,” describes photographer Alessandro Mari.

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GODAFOSS, ICELAND
Icy conditions made this shot a challenge: “Water spray was constantly refreezing to my lens, so I had to frequently wipe it down,” says photographer Ed Graham.

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NACHI GREAT WATERFALL, JAPAN
Over 400 feet high, with a waterflow of one ton per second, Japan’s tallest waterfall is the center of worship at the Kumano Nachi Grand Shrine. PHOTOGRAPH BY HIDENOBU SUZUKI

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TAPPIYA FALLS, PHILIPPINES
The Banaue Rice Terraces, sometimes called the Eighth Wonder of the World, envelop this high waterfall.PHOTOGRAPH BY JOEL BEAR

 

source:nationalgeographic.com